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Saturday, June 4, 2011

War and Medicine exhibit

A resin replica skull of an American soldier injured by a blast in 2003 is among the artifacts on display at the War and Medicine exhibition.
A resin replica skull of an American soldier injured by a blast in 2003 is among the artifacts on display at the War and Medicine exhibition. (Canadian War Museum)
CBC...Tools used to heal rather than to fight with are the main artifacts on display at a major exhibition opening Friday at the Canadian War Museum.
From a plywood prosthetic leg from the First World War to a computerized version that can imitate human walking movements, the "War and Medicine" exhibition follows 150 years of conflict and medicine on the front lines of battle.
The presentation honours the caregivers who helped soldiers maimed and damaged psychologically due to the traumas of war, said Mark O'Neill, director general of the museum.
A blade used to amputate infected limbs is a grim reminder of the primitive tools once used. But another item, a high-tech skull formed from resin, shows how modern medicine has helped soldiers in recent times.

Resin skull replica

The replica skull came from the National Museum of Health and Medicine at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, said Andrew Burtch, a historian with the museum. It was formed from the skull of an American soldier injured in a 2003 roadside bomb.
Museum visitors can view photos, scientific specimens, medical devices and other objects that illustrate how injury, infection and psychological trauma devastate those on the front lines.Museum visitors can view photos, scientific specimens, medical devices and other objects that illustrate how injury, infection and psychological trauma devastate those on the front lines. (Canadian War Museum)
"He survived the blast, went through a CT scan and the computer image generated by that was used to make this perfect resin model," Burtch explained.
"Doctors were then able to use that model to craft a special prosthetic to help repair the portion of skull that was missing."
Katherine Lyons, the interpretive planner for the exhibition, philosophized on the paradox of war and the healing arts.
"In times of war, the medical profession is constantly challenged to adapt, innovate and respond to humanity's capacity to harm," she said. "These two entities rely on one another in ways that are not expected. Medicine serves the purpose of war in recruitment and maintenance of healthy fighting forces."
War and Medicine, adapted from a European exhibition to include Canadian artifacts, will be presented until Nov. 13.

Here is information on the exhibit:

WAR AND MEDICINE
From the battlefield to rehabilitation, War and Medicine explores the uneasy and evolving relationship between warfare and the medical profession.
WHEN?
  May 26, 2011 to November 13, 2011
MORE INFORMATION:GO TO WAR AND MEDICINE
War inflicts terrible physical and mental injuries; medical practitioners try to save lives, manage disease, and rehabilitate the wounded.
Come explore the uneasy and evolving relationship between warfare and the medical profession over 150 years, from the Crimean War to contemporary conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. Through hundreds of powerful artifacts and striking images, War and Medicine will highlight the personal experiences of medical practitioners and their patients in war.
This exhibition contains material and subject matter that some visitors may find disturbing. This includes graphic content related to human injury, illness, sexuality, and medical procedures. It is strongly recommended that adults accompany and supervise children while visiting this exhibition. 
An exhibition created by Wellcome Collection, London, U.K., and the Deutsches Hygiene-Museum, Dresden, Germany.
Image:
© David Cotterrell
GO TO WAR AND MEDICINE
RELATED ACTIVITIES:   Tactical Medicine: The Experience of Paul Franklin as Medical Technician and Casualty 
  Soldier On: Supporting Wounded Canadian Forces Personnel
Also I will be speaking on June 9th at 7 pm at the War Museum...
Please come if you can.

TACTICAL MEDICINE: THE EXPERIENCE OF PAUL FRANKLIN AS MEDICAL TECHNICIAN AND CASUALTY
Paul Franklin served as a medical technician with the Canadian Forces in Afghanistan where he was severely wounded. Come and hear his experiences as both a caregiver and a patient.
EVENT TYPE:TalkWHERE?Barney Danson TheatreWHEN?
  June 9, 2011 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.EnglishFran├žais
AUDIENCE:AdultFEE AND BOOKING INFORMATION:FreeMORE INFORMATION:Paul Franklin served as a medical technician with the Canadian Forces in Afghanistan where he was severely wounded. He has since undertaken a lengthy recovery and become an advocate for wounded Canadian soldiers. Come and hear his experiences as both a caregiver and a patient.PROGRAM:AdultRELATED TO EXHIBITION OR CATEGORY:War and MedicineRELATED ACTIVITIES:   War and Medicine 
  Soldier On: Supporting Wounded Canadian Forces Personnel

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